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As grazing animals, cattle naturally are ground-feeders. Thus, in winter management, beef cattle typically graze winter wheat, or forage for missed ears and fodder in a field of corn after combining.  Since nutrient intake may not provide the needs of the cattle in some of these situations, supplemental hay may dropped on the ground as illustrated in NAL #4863. Alternatively, hay may be fed from a bale feeder to minimize wastage as illustrated for dairy heifers in this image. Occasionally, beef cattle also may be provided limited quantities of concentrates and trace minerals from a feed bunk. The positive energy balance from the concentrates may 'flush' the cattle in preparation for breeding, and train them to consume concentrate with agents such as melengestrol acetate to synchronize estrus and facilitate artificial insemination.

Fence line feeding for dairy cattle

Credit: Case IH

Digital Credit: Case IH

Publisher: None

Rights: No rights reserved - image is in the public domain

Description: As grazing animals, cattle naturally are ground-feeders. Thus, in winter management, beef cattle typically graze winter wheat, or forage for missed ears and fodder in a field of corn after combining. Since nutrient intake may not provide the needs of the cattle in some of these situations, supplemental hay may dropped on the ground as illustrated in NAL #4863. Alternatively, hay may be fed from a bale feeder to minimize wastage as illustrated for dairy heifers in this image. Occasionally, beef cattle also may be provided limited quantities of concentrates and trace minerals from a feed bunk. The positive energy balance from the concentrates may 'flush' the cattle in preparation for breeding, and train them to consume concentrate with agents such as melengestrol acetate to synchronize estrus and facilitate artificial insemination.

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