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This horse-drawn windrow rake typifies those used in harvesting hay on United States dairy farms until the 1930's.  Normally in good drying weather, hay could be raked about a day after it was cut (see NAL #4451).  With rain, the windrows usually were turned again to promote drying, losing nutrient rich leaves in the process.  When the hay had dried sufficiently, it was loaded on a wagon with a hay loader (see NAL #4453), and transferred to the loft of a barn for storage.  With inadequate drying, the hay often became moldy, or occasionally trigger a barn fire.  In more arid areas of the US, sometimes hay was stored in out door stacks with minimal losses.

Windrowing hay with a side delivery rake

Credit: Hoard's Dairyman

Digital Credit: Michel Wattiaux

Publisher: None

Rights: Name must appear as a credit whenever the image is used -

Description: This horse-drawn windrow rake typifies those used in harvesting hay on United States dairy farms until the 1930's. Normally in good drying weather, hay could be raked about a day after it was cut (see NAL #4451). With rain, the windrows usually were turned again to promote drying, losing nutrient rich leaves in the process. When the hay had dried sufficiently, it was loaded on a wagon with a hay loader (see NAL #4453), and transferred to the loft of a barn for storage. With inadequate drying, the hay often became moldy, or occasionally trigger a barn fire. In more arid areas of the US, sometimes hay was stored in out door stacks with minimal losses.

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